April 30, 2008

Languages, NZSL

Languages

Human Rights Comission 2007 annual report: chapter on languages.

New Zealand Sign Lanugage in now one of New Zealand's Official three languages. In New Zealand over 27,000 people use New Zealand Sign Lanugage. It is the twelfth most frequently spoken language in New Zealand. NZ Sign Lanugage Week is in the first week of May 2008.

The chapter on languages in the Human Rights Commission's annual report was released on 21 February 2008 at Te Papa, Wellington by the Race Relations Commissioner Joris De Bres, to mark the UN International Year of Languages.
New Zealand Sign Language is recognised in the New Zealand Curriculum as one of the three official languages that may be studied as a first or additional language.

New Zealand Sign Language(NZSL) in the New Zealand Curriculum was launched in March 2007. This comprises guidelines for teachers to plan and implement relevant programmes. The NZSL Curriculum: - provides the basic information about the history of sign language and New Zealand Deaf culture.

The New Zealand Deaf Film Festival was also held in May 2007 in Auckland, Wellington, Nelson, Christchurch and Dunedin. The festival promoted Deaf culture and language via the medium of short films.

For more information:

http://www.tki.org.nz/e/search/retrieve_search.php?element_array_data=DC.Subject.Keyword%3A%3A1611

(Good to follow the above link to search tki for any other language resource also)

Phone Infoline 0800 496 877
TTY: 0800 150 111 (Tele type writer, you need a special keyboard attached to your phone; know at TTY Internationally.
Email: infoline@hrc.co.nz
Website:www.hrc.co.nz
(hrc = human rights commission)


If you would like to find out more about New Zealand Sign Language Teachers Association contact:

email: info@nzslta.org.nz
Website:www.nzslta.org.nz

For online lessons, see: http://www.nzsign.co.nz

To download the Fingerspelling diagrams see:
http://www.nzsign.co.nz/FingerspellingAlphabt.aspx
Fingerspelling is a useful starting point as it is used to spell names and places and words for which there is no direct translation.
See also on this page how to introduce yourself; My name is ----. And how to say Thankyou.

I attended a one year course of this about 15 years ago as a student at night school, but I must confess I have not used it much since, however I always enjoy to revisit this skill. I still have a folder of handouts and handwritten notes taken. The Tutor was deaf and some in the class were deaf or had family members who were deaf. Both parents and children attended this night class.

Update: Found this contact info in a later library display in 2009.

Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand Tangata Turi.
Deaf.org.nz
2 White Street, Taradale Napier 4112 , New Zealand.

TTY 06 845 9007
Fax 06 8441208
Phone 06 845 9008.

Surprised about the fax- less than 20% use in NZ now.
I decided to stop paying the 2.50 per month for mine this month.



Languages


Need an Interpreter?
From the Office of Ethnic Affairs Te Tari Matawaka 0800 656 656
Language Line Monday - Friday 9am - 6pm

I need an interpreter

I speak ____________

Translation Service 04 4702920

Languages

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